How to decrypt "practilly" any file?

Discussion in 'Computer and Technology Discussion' started by FellFromTheSky, Sep 2, 2019.

  1. FellFromTheSky

    FellFromTheSky New Member

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    Hello,
    I had an idea in the last days, but I think I need help to put it in place.
    At least, if it's doable.
    So the main idea :
    Let's say you have two or more files that have the exact same content but that are encrypted with two different encryption algorithms. Would it be possible to use somekind of regression algorithm or wathever algorithm do decrypt those two or more files into one? Would it work with DRM encrypted files?
    Thanks.
     
  2. InsaneNutter

    InsaneNutter Resident Nutter Staff Member

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    You would still need to decrypt both files before you could do anything with them, even if you decrypted one it wouldn't help decrypt the other, especially if their encrypted in different ways.

    Using Netflix as an example usually shows get ripped because theirs a flaw in the system which allows the decrypted video stream to be accessed and dumped. Granted you can screen record low quality streams, however that's why to access high quality content DRM (encryption) is in place to protect the content, meaning you have to meet strict requirements to play that high quality steam.
     
  3. FellFromTheSky

    FellFromTheSky New Member

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    Sorry, I explained my idea the wrong way.
    Let's say we have a file :
    VIDEO.mp4 that we don't have the source, but only this file encrypted two times in two different files.
    So
    VIDEO.encrypted.1.mp4
    VIDEO.encrypted.2.mp4
    Since we know those two files have the same content, but are encrypted differently, could we find a bytes pattern that would be periodic?
    You know like the "Heil Hitler" in the Imitation Game movie.
    Or maybe analyzing each encoded bytes trough a regression algorithm?
    Or something else?
     
  4. Gridelin

    Gridelin Active Member

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    That isn't really the way modern Cryptography works.
     
  5. FellFromTheSky

    FellFromTheSky New Member

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    So how does it works?
    And if someone have a lot of different videos to encrypt, I don't know why he would take the time to create different decryption keys for the same video but different encryption algorithm.
    For example, if they have an Android application where videos are encrypted trough Google algo and a website where videos are encrypted trough Microsoft algo, and they have a tons of videos ...
    It's why I was talking about my previous idea.
     
  6. InsaneNutter

    InsaneNutter Resident Nutter Staff Member

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    In your example VIDEO.encrypted.1.mp4 might as well be an Xbox game and VIDEO.encrypted.2.mp4 might as well be a PlayStation game. Both are encrypted so you have no idea what the content will be when decrypted, even if you could decrypt one, it would not help you in any way decrypt the other.

    If you read this article on Prime Factorization, it basically explains how things are encrypted and secured on the internet today.

    You could have all the computing power on the planet today and not break strong encryption algorithms

    In the future however when quantum computers become more powerful certain encryption algorithms in use today will be able to be broken in seconds, rather than 100’s of years. However were decades away from that yet and even then quantum computers are going to be the equivalent of today's super computers.
     

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