Identify and copy content from an Xbox One configured USB Hard Drive to a PC

Discussion in 'Xbox One Guides' started by InsaneNutter, Dec 27, 2014.

  1. InsaneNutter

    InsaneNutter Resident Nutter Staff Member

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    So you have followed my previous tutorial on How to copy files to and from an Xbox One USB Formatted hard drive using a Windows PC and now want a method to easily identify what content actually is on your Xbox One USB Hard drive.

    When you have connected an Xbox One configured USB drive to your PC all you will see are random containers and XVI files like this on the root of the USB drive:

    usb-contents-1.png

    At this moment in time no PC tools exist that will easily tell you what each file on the Xbox One USB configured hard drive actually is, however you can work out what content is on your Xbox One USB hard drive pretty easily.

    First you need to decide what you want to copy from your Xbox One configured USB drive, then find this content.

    On the Xbox One Dashboard to go:

    1. My Apps and Games
    2. Now find the game / app / piece of content you wish to copy to your pc
    3. Press the start button on the Xbox One controller, this should bring a menu up
    4. Click on Manage Game
    5. This should then show the name of the storage device the game currently resides on, along with the file size. Make a note of the game name and file size.
    6. Simply click on it using the "A" button on the Xbox One controller
    7. Click Copy all on the menu that appears
    8. You will then get a message on screen confirming you wish to copy from the Internal drive to the external USB hard drive
    9. Click copy and the content will be copied to your Xbox One configured USB hard drive

    In this example we will use the Titanfall Beta, you will notice the Titanfall Beta is 4.8gb, i will need to know this for the next step.

    usb-contents-2.png

    Now you should have all the Xbox One content you wish to extract on the Xbox One configured USB drive, connect this to your PC and enable PC mode as described in my previous tutorial: Copy and Extract content from an Xbox One USB Formatted Drive on a Windows PC

    We know the Titanfall Beta container is 4.8GB, so simply look for a 4.8GB file on the Xbox One USB drive.
    Now all you need to do is simply copy the container file and the 1kb XVI file in to a folder with a meaningful name. The container and xvi file will be named the same:

    usb-contents-4.png

    You can right click on the file and go to properties to see the exact size in GB. You will notice this is 4.8GB, the same file size the Xbox One reported the Titanfall Beta as:

    usb-contents-3.png

    There you have it, a pretty simple way to identify what is on your Xbox One USB configured hard drive and copy the content to the PC.

    At the moment in time you can't do anything with Xbox One content once you have copied it off the USB drive, however it's still useful to archive rare content such as beta's which can not be downloaded again, especially as this content could easily be removed from your console by Microsoft in the future.

    Although the content might not be usable now, it will be again one day when the Xbox One is hacked.

    What ever reason you have for wanting to copy something from your Xbox One to the PC, this is easiest way to currently do so in my opinion. Hopefully this tutorial is of some help to someone in the future.
     
  2. Neoteam1

    Neoteam1 Addict

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    Does this now mean people can copy games from one usb to another and play on another console?
     
  3. InsaneNutter

    InsaneNutter Resident Nutter Staff Member

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    Yes, but you could do that anyway by simply using the Xbox One dashboard. This does nothing new, it's simply an easy way to identify content on the Xbox One formatted USB hard drive when it's connected to a PC.
     

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